In The Focus

To visualize temporality is a great aritstic pledge. “Hidden Time” by PAF interprets time as a mechanical construction at first sight,inasmuch as the circles scooped into the harsh surface of the painting evoke the spur wheels of a clock. At the center of the artwork, as contact point of all these components, there is a clockface. PAF represents measurable, objective time. Nevertheless this isn’t the full extenct of temporality. The paining’s dark colors, it’s scrachty,mysterious surface, infinite inner spaces do not suggest the domesticity,concreteness of the illustrated topic. Technical complexity of the picture carries the possibility of mental compelxity: the painting tells about time that is accessible to all, about subjective time, even about the time of the artwork. The picture is bisected by a vertical red gesture,which is dominating the whole painting, and could be the intervention into operation of time. With this powerful gesture PAF takes possesion of the unknowable on “Hidden Time”.

photo: misi

written by: Zsófi Máté

Hidden Time (100x50cm, mixed technique on wood, 2013)

Hidden time (100x50 cm, vegyes technika, 2013)_eng

In The Focus

„Demons and Chaos I-IV” by PAF create a whole. The four artworks share the same system of gestures, they are perfect continuation of each other. The dynamic, powerful gestures don’t respect their frames, stretch beyond their measures, so the for paintings become permeable. The „Demons and Chaos” series is an open artwork, both visually and mentally. The interlocking gestures create a chaotic, deep, quintessential space in the picture, and in some cases they become dark, demonic figures. Variety of touch, colors, consistency of the paint the viewer can always pioneer new figures in trying to be released of the demons haunting them, overcome the chaos, reveal the secret hidden by the paint streaks. New recognitions lead to other representations. Accordingly reflexive relations of the viewer and the artwork can change the whole painting, is able to generate very different emotional impressions. This mental openness makes „Demons and Chaos” series by PAF unfailing, always vivifies it in new and other lives.

 

photo: Misi

written by: Zsófi Máté

 

Demons and Chaos I-IV (100x50cm/piece, mixed technique on wood, 2014)

 

Demons and Chaos I-IV(100x50cm:piece, mixed technique on wood, 2014) copy_eng

In The Focus

Chaos means in vulgar tounge maze, an unwanted condition, in which we would rather not spend time. On the other hand, chaos means infinite space, unshapen matter, from which the universe came into existance. Latter approaches “Chaos” by PAF. Stratification of the paint, varied facture provides strained tone to the picture, which plants the fear of the unknowable into the viewer, but this is only the surface. If we lose ourselves in the artwork, the chaotic spectacle could become an order without any eventuality.Gestures create a conscious system, they are forces taking effect on eachother in tackle on the painting, mostly the black and the white ones. In the space of strained relations of dark and light, as the center of the composition, there is a red gesture, which is one of the most important elements in PAF’s art. This is the substratum of the painting’s order, which vindicates and terminates the aforsaid discrepancy at the same time. Unity of gestures, colors and matter on PAF’s artwork is materialization of the creativeness chaos possesses.

photo: Misi

written by: Zsófi Máté

Chaos (100x100cm, mixed technique on wood, 2013)

Chaos (100x100 cm, vegyes technika, 2013)_eng

In The Focus

„Cloister” and „City Lights” by Róbert Csáki show similarity in colours, touch and in representation of lights. The landscapes on the pictures despite their strangeness carry the sense, that we have seen them before. They could be fantasies or memories, which are beyond control, surrounded by versatilty, transiency. On „Cloister” from the background’s infinite, deep shade buildings meet the eye, which are dissevered from their environment because of light perfusing them. Whiteness of the church’s tower has a central role, it rules the painting. Constructivity of this colour is determining in case of „City Lights” too. The two white paintstains overwrite the harmony of deep colours on the artwork. However what seems breaking of the picture’s order is in fact a necessary component. Reddish spots on „Cloister” are also telling of a conscious, precise composition. They change the whole painting, terminate the accidental aspect of the sinister,transitory landscapes. Inter alia these tiny paintstains contain the genius of Róbert Csáki.Their startling strength is realization, turning into stationarity of riddling interaction of tones and light and unlimited visions.

photo: Misi
written by: Zsófi Máté
Cloister (30x30cm, oil on wood, 2013)
City lights (40x35cm, oil on wood, 2013)

 

Kolostor_Varosi fenyek_eng

In The Focus

On „Saturnus” by Róbert Csáki we meet with a strange creature. It posseses with animal and human features at the same time, and because of it’s name we can’t forget about the godlike temper either. According to mythology, Saturnus ate his own children, because they meant danger to his power. In the representation of Rubens or Goya in the eye of the god is unrelenting craze, while he is transacting his terrible action. Saturnus by Róbert Csáki is different. Though the blood guttering from his mouth tells of sin, his visage – if the viewer is able to stand it – suggests repetance. This eye is almost ruling the painting’s spell-binder spectacle. Csáki placed Saturnus into a misty landscape, whose body, because of the variety of colors and touch is like its composed of many matter and aggregate. His beautiful unreality or his stylized surroundings becomes ready for the viewer because of his visage. He looks out of the picture, breaks his closed world. He stands in defencelessness front of us, and so do we in front of him. We know the sin of the creature in Róbert Csákis masterpiece, but his trenchant visage tells, that he may knows our sins too. Let him be a being of a sphere far from us, his strangeness becomes familiar, even friendly if we are looking at him long enough, and his visage reflects us like a mirror.

photo: Misi

written by: Zsófi Máté

Saturnus (200x300cm, oil on canvas, 2013)

Saturnus (200x300 cm, olaj, vaszon, 2013)_eng

In The Focus

 

„Housing Project I.” and „Housing Project II.” by Róbert Csáki have grand strength despite their small sizes. On the artist’s running exhibition we placed them far, contrapuntally from eachother. The attach of the two picture establishes a space just like the paintings themselves: territory. Csáki overwrites the conventional attitude to housing project, translates it’s representation. His soft brushstrokes, pale, almost romantic lights settle the sternness of these houses. The buildings melt in their environment, they do not wake the sense of strangeness, they are not the appearance of a restricted world. On the contrary, Csáki’s bland lines assign mistique to the modern territory, he shows us a world we want worm ourselves into. In case of „Housing Project I.” and „Housing Project II.” we see the houses from a lurking-perspective, the light in the windows are rather the signs of life, than claustrophobia’s. The strong-colored bridgings in the foregrounds stretch beyond the margins of the paintings. They show the never-enclosingness, which is also transmitted by the artworks.

photo: Misi

written by: Zsófi Máté

Housing project I. and Housing project II. (21x21cm, oil on wood, 2013)

Lakotelep 2_1 fevo (21x21 cm, olaj, fatabla, 2013) eng

In The Focus

„The Sun King” by Róbert Csáki alloys technical precisity of old masters with query of today. The title of the painting already refers to withered styles, the baroque, and it’s visual world rather to the rococo. Portraits of the XVII. and XVIII. century fill the figures with life, by movement, coquetry of red cheeks, gracefulness of folds, clairvoyant visage. Csáki applies the playful usage of lights and colors of these styles, the figure of „The Sun King” is illuminated from the depth of the background. The body is clotted in whirling by many gradation of green, it is a cadocous texture, which represents the mistique of baroque fold. What truly modern is in the painting, that Csáki not only visualizeses the figure, but also dissects it, overwrites the genre of portrait. „The Sun King” does not have visage, which encumbers to look at it as a human. Although, this feeling of hiatus and the surly darkness of colors is overwritten by the open mouth of the figure, which transforms the lifeless atmosphere of the painting. Like he would moan, breathing his fear and angst into the world. This act becomes the sign of cut-off between life and death, which pervades the picture. Thus Csáki interweaves the vital blandness of baroque, and the blow-up of inner suffering (as by Francis Bacon) in this masterpiece.

photo: Misi

written by: Zsófi Máté

The Sun King (78×66 cm, oil on canvas, 2013)

Napkiraly (78x66 cm, olaj, vaszon, 2013) eng

In The Focus

„Uptown Workshop (Philadelphia)” by László Gyémánt is a realistic detail of a city, understandable by Paul Cézanne’s the idea about landscape: man is absent from it, but completely within the brain. Sense of leaving behind dominates the picture, incarnated in the dying workshop or the unowned car. These are the stock of the painting, which could be defined as the objective world of a social class, milieu, standard of living. However, Gyémánt’s unmoved, willfully void-profundity portrayal alienates from the underlying,these objects should refer to. They do not advert to a bigger context, do not become symbols of a bigger reality, do not lead to the people they belong to. What is there on „Uptown Workshop” by László Gyémánt, shows indeed what is absent. All this goes beyond the alienation of people from their objective world, and captures visually their irreversible fragmentation, in stony, inexorably precise style.

photo: Misi

written by: Zsófi Máté

Uptown Workshop, Philadelphia (50×70 cm, oil on canvas, 2009)

Kulvarosi szerelomuhely _ Philadelphia (50x70 cm, olaj, vaszon, 2009)_eng

In The Focus

„Missed Moment” by Mózes Incze thickens time. Stationarity dominates everything, the sitting figure in the foreground and the stone standing in front of him. The clouds and smoke wreathing behind him, the lifeless grey body, the white feather are floating with ease, but the strained permanence int them doesn’t permits motion. The lights and shadows, the bodies and the fold are stiffen.

The sand-glass in front of the main figure reports the suspicion which encompasses the whole picture: time has been stopped on the painting. Mózes Incze locked temporality into this tiny object. The sand cannot twirl because of the status of the sand-glass.

Windup the passing of time raises a question: what is that missed moment the title refers to? Is it possible to talk about moments, if time doesn’t pass, if the chain of momentary nows is torn?

The sand-glass on a key-holder becomes the actual key to the painting. The lens of the camera, holded by the blindfold figure is also aiming at it. It is laying on a surface, overtopping from the space of the picture, if it would tilt down, passing of time, running of the world, lives of the people in the paiting could start over. Maybe the photographer is waiting for this, he wants to record this inevitable moment. Hope of the shifting of the sand-glass is holded up by tender brushstrokes, but the blindness of the man with the camera is hamstring it. He wouldn’t be able to see the change, he will not have loophole from this closed space. The thick timelessness, weighing on the painting by Mózes Incze is only understandable through the lines of Attila József: „Blue, yellow, red, they flocked my dream,/ smudged images the mind had taken,/ I felt the cosmic order gleam-/ and not a speck of dust was shaken.”

photo: Misi

written by: Zsófi Máté

Missed moments (190×140cm, oil on canvas, 2011)

Kimaradt pillanat (190x140 cm, olaj, vaszon, 2011) eng