In The Focus

On “Memory of Poland” by István Csík we can see a cityscape build of geometrical shapes. Buildings, streets appear in a thickend form, alike to expressionism. The spectacle is unequivocally not the copy of reality, but an idividual perspective, the relationship between sense and the real world. “Walking in the city” by Michel de Certeau says, that the city is a text, which is read and written by the voyeur at same time. This means, that the picture of the city is formed by the subject from what is given. This way the subject thickens, obscures, highlights, creates symbols, so in the and only what catches the eye become visible. For example, only one buliding can symbolise a whole district. This leads us to the artwork by István Csík. In the foreground of the picture, there is a figure, which is rung the whole space of the painting, though the contructive elements lead us to the background. The size of the building constructions and the woman are nearly the same. This shifted scale means the importance of the figure, so it becomes the main motive of the memory, the symbol of the city. Gracefulness of the woman, her elegance given by light colours awakens the sense of pureness. This clearness tipyfies the whole picture. With the pale shades, white lights István Csík is composing clear thoughts, clean emotions. Although behind the freshness of the artwork is hiding the dark side of memories. We select them, euphemise the past and its persons, we place the events of our lives to a changing narrative. The woman on “Memory of Poland” has no face, and her body almost fades into her environment. We could say it is a meagre memory, or in fact untrue. But The painting by István Csík says just the very opposite. A memory never true or untrue, but it is ours. Much as it is changeable, stays unquestionable forever.

 

photo: Mihály Borsos (misi)

written by: Zsófi Máté

Lengyelorszagi emlek (65x68 cm, olaj, farost, 2014)_eng

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memory of Poland (65x68cm, oil on wood, 2014)

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