In The Focus

“Once risen up to the sky, the star/of night river’s not worth much.”- said Attila József, referring to the fact, that art can not perfectly imitate reality, but this is not the aim of it at all. I feel this thought in “Star Projections” by István Csík. The substrate of the artwork is given by space ordering power of constructive formations, but in the center stays the form of circle, which is unlikely in the painting of István Csík. The importance of these shows their colors, which are lightening between the dark shades of painting, avoiding the often used light colors. “Star Projections” tells about in it’s every detail, how the artist, people are related to the universe, which is surrounding and transcending us. István Csík represents the stars in a secure, structured frame within the picture. These gesture can refer to how human beings want from the start of their history recognise and possess the always unreachable transcend world. But in the end, every science and art form has to admit: what we can reach, recognise, is a picture we formed for ourselves, for the scale of human intellect, a projection only. This is what the space outside of the inner frame on the picture tells about. It shows the threatening, deep, thick, formless, dark material, which is the unkown part of our world. “Star Projections” by István Csík revolves to more planes, these symbolize more mental planes. The question of the painting stays open: can we strictly separate these planes? In my opinion, master Csík is showing with this special artwork, that the aforesaid mental planes (just as the planes of the picture’s space) can only exist through each other.

photo: misi
written by: Zsófi Máté

Csillagvetuletek (170x115 cm, olaj, farost, 2009)_eng

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Star Projections (170×115 cm, oil on wood, 2009)

In The Focus

From the title of „Sky, Mount, Water” by István Csík we could think of a traditional landscape. But the master awarded with Munkácsy-prize doesn’t want to represent nature, but to explore a deeper sturcture with the resource of abstraction. „Sky, Mount, Water” is in fact deconstruction, reinterpreting of the named elements of nature. As the result of this process a concentrarte of nature becomes visible on the canvas. The order of the space in the picture is ruled by a horizontal and a vertical red and white stripe, which are crossing eachother, dividing four equal parts of the painting. If we are are observing these sections separately, it turns out, that we find in each of them a form, color a motive, which recalls sky, mount and water. Each of these four parts have indipendent inner order, but they are also in connection. István Csík fills the elements of abtraction with refined shades, while the tender brushwork enacts the forms to natural surfaces. The similar forms- though they are distant on the picture- have the similar world of colors. The viewers can imagine, that they put together these similar forms, so the pieces of the puzzle eject a traditional landscape. But after this imagination, the pieces tear again, and then we recognize the real structure, de given order on „Sky, Mount, Water” by István Csík. In my opinion this painting is a main work of the consecvent life work, which is the concentrate of the interrelation of nature-representation and abstraction.

 

written by: Zsófi Máté
photo: misi

 

Eg, hegy, viz (175x126 cm, olaj, vaszon, 2010)_eng

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Sky, Mount, Water (175×126 cm, oil on canvas, 2010)